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Saturday, November 13, 2021

US Sports Basketball Featuring: 10 Shooting Tips That Will Increase Your Shooting Percentage

 

10 Shooting Tips That Will Increase Your Shooting Percentage


Every basketball coach I’ve ever had said the easiest ways to find yourself on the bench is to miss shots, turn the basketball over, and to not give 100%. Although a missed shot is perhaps better than a turnover with the chance for an offensive rebound, coaches don’t want to see their players throwing up contested jumpers when there are better options. With these ten shooting tips, I’ll look to provide you with techniques and tips to improve that field goal percentage in a hurry.


US Sports Basketball:

On this week's show we have an outstanding shooting guard out of North Carolina who is also a beast on defense.

Be sure to stick around for part two as we give you some coaching tips on the selfsame position from our partners at CoachTube. Enjoy!


Master Softball

TIP #1: Become a student of the game

There is a lot of value to be learned through watching some of the greats do what they do best. Watching NBA games or collegiate matches can offer an opportunity to closely observe how the pros shoot and apply it to your own game. Follow how these shooters are working both with and without the ball and look for the elite shooters on each team. Another tool would be to watch basketball instructional videos or watch YouTube of guys like Ray Allen and Stephen Curry.

TIP #2: Watch your shot on film

Seeing your shot on film can be a real eye-opener. It makes it easier to understand where you are succeeding and what areas still need some seasoning. This drill will really provide benefits into making some finishing touches on your jumper to prevent any mechanical issues.

TIP #3: Get to the basket

The majority of young players today all want to be the ones knocking down threes. However, if you become overly reliant on shooting from distance, your field goal percentage will likely suffer as a result. To offset this, you need to possess the ability to attack the basket. Not only will this get you some easier looks, but the chances of earning a trip to the free throw line increases as well. In practice you can work on penetration looks to improve this trait.

TIP #4: Understand your tendencies

Every player has certain areas of the court where they feel more comfortable shooting. Whether it is from the top of the key or the baselines, tendencies develop the more time you spend playing. To complement this, players need to find out the percentages they shoot from these different spots. By doing so, you can sort of gravitate to your hot spots during half-court sets. Master these jump shots and you will see your field goal percentage rise rapidly.

TIP #5: Practice game shots

If you are just messing around in practice, you can’t expect to be fully prepared come game time. Practice time is vital and as a result should be utilized to perfect your game. Thus, whether it be scrimmaging or basic basketball drills, attack it like an actual game. More specifically, take shots you would take in a game, run the offense like you are in the closing minutes of a tight contest, and always give it 100%.

TIP #6: Shoot with a teammate or partner

Although you might not always have this luxury, it can provide dividends to shoot around with someone else. This will not only allow you to have someone to rebound for you and get up more shots, but it can help you relax. Personally, I have always found this method to be far more beneficial than shooting alone, as it makes it more enjoyable. It also provides you with the opportunity to compete on making shots, such as a three point or free throw contest.

TIP #7: Practice every shot

Even if you are a bruising center, possessing the ability to step out and knock down a three is becoming more common in today’s game. Likewise, if you fit the mold of small point guard whose primary responsibilities are distributing the ball and shooting the open outside jump shot, you still need to be able to make a floater or mid-range jumper. Ultimately, you should make time to practice all your shots from close-range, mid-range, to long-range each time you are in the gym.

TIP #8: Focus on the follow through

A perfect follow through is vital when it comes to sharp shooting. As defined by USA Basketball: “Your wrists need to be very relaxed, and your fingers need to be pointed at where you shoot the ball. You should be able to see your fingers at the top of the backboard. Make sure you hold this position until the ball hits the target.”

TIP #9: Shoot contested moving shots in practice

Only shooting wide open shots in practice won’t help you much in games. Chances are you won’t be coming off a back screen without a hand in your face during game time. To combat this, you need to practice these types of scenarios in practice. Otherwise, by the time you get into the game, you won’t know how to react when a defender comes racing out to contest.

TIP #10: Practice, Practice, Practice

By now, you probably picked up on a common theme throughout these drills. When it comes down to improving your field goal percentage, you are the only person that can make a significant change in your game. Shooting basketball is an art. There are so many situations that can arise in a game. The only way to ensure you are prepared to make game shots is by shooting each and every shot hundreds of times in practice.

The great Allen Iverson once said, “If you’re struggling with your shooting, then do other things on the basketball court. Get steals, get assists, get rebounds – do anything on the court to help the team win.” This quote fits perfectly with this article. Yes, improving your field goal percentage is critical, but in some games your shot may not be there and that is when you must keep scrapping however you can.


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