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Saturday, September 28, 2019

The Truth About Cancer Featuring: Annamaria’s Battle with Thyroid Cancer - Cancer Survivor Story




While filming our most recent documentary series in Asia, we met up with Annamaria, who shared her story of recovery from Stage 3 thyroid cancer.

 After being diagnosed with Stage 3 thyroid cancer (papillary and medullary in two different tumors that spread to the lymph nodes), Annamarie did not want to go through radiation or radioactive iodine therapy.

 Instead, Annamaria set out to heal herself naturally. She began expressing herself through painting, filling herself with positive energy.

 From diet to essential oils, watch the full video to discover which methods worked best for her. And discover the power of prananadi healing as an alternative cancer treatment.

 We were so happy to hear that after just 3 months, there was no longer any evidence of disease.

 If you like this video, please comment below and share this post with others you love and care about.

Thyroid Cancer


By: Dr Ranjit Gabriel Magherra


The thyroid is a small gland shaped like a butterfly that sits in the lower part of your neck in front of your windpipe. The function of the gland is to produce hormones. The main hormone released by the gland is thyroxine. The normal action of thyroid hormones is to keep all bodily functions occurring at a correct rate.

Thyroid cancer usually present as a nodule or lump in the neck called a thyroid nodule. Thyroid
nodules are relatively common, occurring in between 4 – 10% of the general population, although autopsy studies have reported up to 50% incidence in post-mortems on patients with no known thyroid disease. Most thyroid nodules are benign (90%).

There is a higher incidence of thyroid cancer in females (3.5: 1) but patients at extremes of age
( 50 years) and males are more likely to harbour a cancer within a thyroid nodule.

Is it deadly?

Thyroid cancer spans the entire spectrum of clinical aggressiveness, from micropapillary
carcinoma (often incidentally found, and measuring less than 10mm by definition) that does not
impact patient survival, to anaplastic carcinoma, which results in death within 6 months. The
commonest type of thyroid cancer is papillary carcinoma.

How to detect Thyroid Cancer?

The most important investigative modality is the fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) that can be
performed in the clinic, with minimum morbidity and often without local anaesthesia. This test tells us with about 80-90% accuracy whether the thyroid nodule is benign or malignant

Though less accurate in predicting whether a thyroid nodule is malignant, the thyroid ultrasound is still a useful tool in that it provides excellent anatomic detail regarding the nodule, accurate measurements (which are useful if the nodule is to be managed conservatively) and it provides information about the entire gland configuration that includes the presence of subclinical nodules in the contralateral lobe. It also allows for the evaluation of subtle central and lateral neck node enlargement. Features that suggest malignancy on ultrasound are central microcalcifications,irregular or blurred margins, marked hypoechogenicity, intranodular vascular pattern and an incomplete peripheral halo.


Treatment for Thyroid Cancer
Surgery is the most common form of treatment
for thyroid cancer that has not spread to distant
parts of the body. A part or the entire thyroid
and any other affected tissue, such as the
lymph nodes is usually removed with this
procedure. This procedure however may not be
recommended when a patient is found to have
thyroid cancer that has spread. Treatment may
include radioactive iodine therapy, and/or
hormone therapy.


Dr Ranjit Gabriel Magherra, Consultant Ear, Nose and Throat, Head & Neck Surgeon, Nobel ENT Head, Neck and Thyroid Surgery Centre

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