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Showing posts with label injuries. Show all posts
Showing posts with label injuries. Show all posts

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Dealing With Planter Fasciitis - Inflammation And Pain Going Through The Foot

Nate-and-Michelle-Miller-Transformation-1997.jpg
Let's face it athletes and warriors. The more active you are there are times it seems the more aches, pains and unfortunately sometimes injuries occur. Due however to your increased conditioning, your body is more apt to recover quickly.
One of those little aches is the one described below. Its best to know how to handle these conditions so that you can minimize or even eliminate its effects on your life. Take it away John!
-Nate


Dealing With Planter Fasciitis - Inflammation And Pain Going Through The Foot

by John Bolton

What is Planter Fasciitis? Planter Fasciitis is an abnormal condition of foot which is characterized by pain and inflammation of the foot. Especially, it causes inflammation of the tissue from heel to the arch of the foot. It is actually an inflammation of the plantar fascia ligament which runs along the bottom of the foot. The plantar fascia ligament is composed of fibrous bands of tissue and runs between the heel bone and toes. Inflammation increases when tears occur in this tissue.

Symptoms of Planter Fasciitis

The symptoms are, severe pain usually on the underside of the heel especially in the morning. The pain slowly reduces but starts developing with prolonged walking or stress.

Causes of this Foot Condition

What exactly causes this foot condition? Well, there are a number of things that cause this foot condition. You will find that many athletes deal with it as they put a lot of repetitive stress on the tissue in their foot.

Many athletes are known for dealing with this foot condition as they face inflammation and tears of the tissue as they put a lot of stress on their tissue. So, are there any other causes? Well, another cause is arthritis. As you know, arthritis can cause inflammation to come about in the tendons, which leads to this foot condition.

Another main cause of Planter Fasciitis is arthritis. Arthritis can cause inflammation to develop in tendons, finally leading to Planter Fasciitis. This abnormality is common among elderly patients. Diabetes is also an important factor which contributes to Planter Fasciitis. So diabetic patients should concentrate in diabetes foot care. Body weight plays a key role in the health of the heel. It is obvious that our heels absorb our body's pressure, being overweight can easily end up in Planter Fasciitis.

Treatment Methods that are Available

As for the treatment, there are many treatment methods out there that are effective. It can start out with something like physiotherapy. There is also losing weight, using foot massagers and even resting the feet. There are some scenarios where surgery is needed in order to help the problem get better.

The treatment can start off with something as simple as physiotherapy. This involves stretching the Achilles tendon as well as the plantar fascia and losing weight. It could also involve using foot massagers and resting. There are some cases where surgeries are done.


Foot Massagers will help to both prevent and cure the problem. So if you have the foot condition, use Foot Massagers to get rid of it and if you don't have it, use it to prevent it.




Source: http://www.PopularArticles.com/article171536.html
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Monday, August 18, 2014

Does that hurt? Exercise injuries...

-Nate Lewis US Sports Strength and Conditioning

Can you relate to this scenario? After putting it off for too long, you commit to get fit—only to find yourself injured the minute you start working out. 

All of the sudden your fitness goals go back on the shelf and you are left to deal with the pain.

Whether your injury occurs right off the bat or after years of regular workouts the result is always the same. It is discouraging, painful and downright depressing.

And since studies suggest that up to 38% of all exercisers suffer from an injury each year, it is a subject worth exploring.

Top 3 Workout Injuries
The following three ailments occur commonly among active people. Let's explore the cause of each and then detail your very own injury prevention plan—because let's face it, you simply don't have time to spend nursing and injury (and losing all that progress you had made).

1. Strain / Pulled Muscle: occurs when a tendon (connects muscle to bone) or muscle is stretched or torn. If you suffer from a strain you will feel pain and swelling in the muscle belly, or loss of function if the strain occurred in a tendon. Many strains occur as the result of an improper warm-up and insufficient stretching.

2. Sprain: occurs when a ligament (connects bone to bone) is stretched or torn. While this can happen to any ligament in your body, the most common placements of sprains are in the ankle, wrist and knee. Often this injury will happen suddenly as the ligament is stretched beyond its normal limit, usually during a fall or other acute trauma.

3. Low Back Pain: it is said that 80% of the population will experience back pain at some point in their lives—and the list of causes is as diverse as the sufferers themselves. Here are the main reasons for workout related back pain:
  • Improper form: Similar to bad posture, using improper form while performing weight bearing exercises will leave your back sore and aching. The good news is that once your form is corrected this pain should subside after a healing period.
  • Weak muscles: If you have a desk job then chances are your deep back muscles are inactive and unconditioned. When you start an exercise program, but fail to properly strengthen these muscles, the result is often an aching back.
  • Strained muscles: Not to pick on that desk job, but another result of sitting all day is tight back muscles. When these muscles are not properly warmed up and stretched before exercise begins, muscle strains occur.
Your 5-Step Injury Prevention Plan
Injuries don't have to slow you from meeting your fitness goals. The following 5 steps will dramatically reduce your chance of injury and if you do find yourself injured, but have been following these 5 steps, your recovery will be quick and efficient.

Step 1: Stretch
What is more boring than stretching? You want to exercise, not sit around touching your toes—right? Even though it isn't exciting, stretching is the best way to increase muscle elasticity and durability. Tight muscles are big contributors to strains—remember? Take the time to stretch everyday before and after your workout to stave off injury.

Step 2: Warm Up
Preparing for your workout should not begin and end with putting on your gym clothes. Your muscles need to be coaxed into motion by way of a 10-15 minute warm up in order to prepare them for injury-free use. Cold muscles are less elastic and are therefore more prone to tears.

Step 3: Proper Gear
For most fitness enthusiasts proper gear has everything to do with their shoes. Don't be fooled—not just any shoe will do. Find shoes that offer support and traction for your exercise of choice, and make sure that they aren't too tight or too loose. If you are prone to ankle injuries then try a pair of high-tops for extra support.

Step 4: Lifestyle
Stop for a moment and think about your car—if you don't maintain it with regular tune ups, oil changes and quality fuel then you can't expect it to perform well on the road. The same applies to your body. Getting healthy amounts of sleep, eating well balanced meals and staying hydrated will all contribute to your performance during exercise. The healthier your lifestyle is the less likely you are to suffer an injury.

Step 5: Condition
This may seem like the most obvious step to injury prevention, but unfortunately it is the most overlooked. People who keep their bodies in top condition by exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy lifestyle are the least likely to injure themselves. When exercise programs are started and stopped sporadically your muscles are most likely to become injured.

Of course being conditioned also has another great benefit that everyone enjoys - you get to look and feel great! And who doesn't what that, right?

The ultimate injury prevention plan is to work with me, your qualified fitness expert! Together we will explore proper technique and will craft a plan for your unique fitness goals.

Wouldn't you love to see awesome results before this summer comes to an end? Simply reply to this email, call me today, or click here, to get started. It's time to take action and get the results that you deserve!

Your Ticket to Get Fit!
Come give my fitness program a try. I have the whole fat loss equation down to a science, and I'd love nothing more than to help you achieve your fitness goal.

My workouts have been known to burn up to 500 calories at a time, so what are you waiting for?

Let's do this! 
Spinach & Egg White Wrap
This wrap is delicious for breakfast, lunch or dinner. It's ready in a flash, tastes amazing, and is filled with lean protein, veggies and whole sprouted grains. Try it today, but don't be surprised if you get hooked! Servings: 2 

Here's what you need:
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/4 cup tomato, finely chopped
  • 2 cups spinach, roughly chopped
  • 1 cup egg whites
  • dash of salt and pepper
  • 2 sprouted grain tortillas
  • 2 Tablespoons pesto (purchase it pre-made, or combine 1/2 cup walnuts, 2 cups basil leaves, 2 cloves garlic, 1/4 cup olive oil, and 1 Tablespoon lemon juice in a food processor and blend until it becomes a paste.)
  1. Spread a tablespoon of pesto over each tortilla and set aside.
  2. In medium sized skillet warm the olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté until golden. Add the tomato and cook for another 3 minutes. Add the spinach and cook until it is soft and wilted. Remove the veggies from skillet, set aside in a bowl.
  3. Pour the egg whites into the skillet, season with salt and pepper. Cook until the egg is no longer runny.
  4. Arrange half of the egg whites in a line down the center of each tortilla. Top with half of the veggies and then fold the ends up and wrap like a burrito.
Nutritional Analysis: One serving equals: 288 calories, 10g fat, 28g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, and 21g protein.

Help me spread the fitness truth... Forward this newsletter to your friends, family and co-workers by using the ‘Refer a Friend' link below!

Friday, August 8, 2014

Common Treatment for Sports Injuries: RICE

Some common 'on-the-spot' treatment that every athlete and fitness warrior should know. The more active you are, the more likely you will sustain some kind of ailment or even God forbid, injury. The good news is that the better conditioned you are, the quicker you can recover on average. 
Get conditioned! Click here to start your program
-Nate
 
RICE, one of the most common and important acronyms in the world of sports, means Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. Adhering to the RICE regimen for the first 48 hours after your injury, is often all that you'll need to get back on your feet. The idea behind RICE is to minimize the inflammation and swelling that occurs with a sports injury.
Rest. Stop the activities that will aggravate your injury. You can, however, choose another activity that doesn't hurt. For example, if you have pulled a hamstring while running, you can continue your upper-body weight-training. Rest can mean the difference between an injury that heals properly and one that continues to bother you for months.
Ice. Ice reduces the swelling and stops the pain by constricting blood flow to the injured area. Don't apply ice directly to your skin--wrap the ice in cloth or apply it over an elastic bandage. You should ice 2-3 times a day, at first, and decrease to once a day, thereafter, until the pain is improving. The old axiom of "ice then heat" is no longer accepted by sports specialists and ice on a daily basis is recommended.

Compression. Compressing the injured area with an elastic bandage immediately after the injury limits fluid leakage into nearby areas and helps to reduce the swelling. You should wrap the bandage tightly enough so you feel some tension, but not so firmly that you cut off the circulation or feel numbness.

Elevation. Elevating the injured body part decreases swelling and improves fluid drainage. Elevation works best when used in conjunction with the rest of the RICE treatment. The body part should be elevated above the joint that is between that body part and the heart--i.e. foot must be higher than the knee and hip; The hand must be higher than the elbow and the shoulder.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Pumping Iron Cuts Football Injury Severity

No secret here and this is one we have posted before, but always worth another look:

 
Lifting weights may be the key to preventing severe injuries to football players, according to a three-year study of high school athletes in Florida.
The study found 78% of severe injuries to the upper body, especially shoulder separations, occurred among football players not involved in a strength-training program of controlled weight lifting. In addition, 64% of those with severe injuries to the lower body, including knee injuries, also were athletes not involved in the training program.
"These are very significant numbers," said Dr. MaryBeth Horodyski, assistant professor of exercise and sports sciences at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. "The bottom line is, those kids who did strength training typically did not have as severe injuries. They more often had mild or moderate injuries."
The study involving teams at 13 high schools turned up 887 injuries among football players. Mild injuries were defined as those which kept players out of practice or a game for seven days or less. Downtime for moderate injuries was 7 to 21 days, and severe injuries included those that kept players out of action for more than 21 days.
Roughly one third of the players in the study sustained injuries. However, Horodyski said that she and the team of athletic trainers and doctors assigned to the study were not surprised by that figure. According to national statistics, some type of injuries occur in 25% to 50% of athletes playing football during a given year, she points out.
The Florida study found defensive linemen are the most frequently injured players, and the most common type of injury for all positions is a sprain.
Fewer injuries were recorded during spring football, probably because it is less intense than fall play, the researcher said.
"The take-home message for coaches is, they need to implement a well-structured strength-training program for their players throughout the entire season," Horodyski stated. "It won't cut down on the total number of injuries, but time-loss goes down drastically if the injuries are not severe."
Source: Stroke

Saturday, January 7, 2012

Pumping Iron Greatly Reduces Severe Football Injuries

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Lifting weights may be the key to preventing severe injuries to football players, according to a three-year study of high school athletes in Florida.


The study found 78% of severe injuries to the upper body, especially shoulder separations, occurred among football players not involved in a strength-training program of controlled weight lifting. In addition, 64% of those with severe injuries to the lower body, including knee injuries, also were athletes not involved in the training program.


"These are very significant numbers," said Dr. MaryBeth Horodyski, assistant professor of exercise and sports sciences at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. "The bottom line is, those kids who did strength training typically did not have as severe injuries. They more often had mild or moderate injuries."


The study involving teams at 13 high schools turned up 887 injuries among football players. Mild injuries were defined as those which kept players out of practice or a game for seven days or less. Downtime for moderate injuries was 7 to 21 days, and severe injuries included those that kept players out of action for more than 21 days.


Roughly one third of the players in the study sustained injuries. However, Horodyski said that she and the team of athletic trainers and doctors assigned to the study were not surprised by that figure. According to national statistics, some type of injuries occur in 25% to 50% of athletes playing football during a given year, she points out.


The Florida study found defensive linemen are the most frequently injured players, and the most common type of injury for all positions is a sprain.


Fewer injuries were recorded during spring football, probably because it is less intense than fall play, the researcher said.




"The take-home message for coaches is, they need to implement a well-structured strength-training program for their players throughout the entire season," Horodyski stated. "It won't cut down on the total number of injuries, but time-loss goes down drastically if the injuries are not severe."


Source: Stroke (1997;28:1908-1912)