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Showing posts with label Baseball Basketball Bench press Bodybuilding Chris bryant Compete Deadlift Diet Fitness Football Frank sepe Goal Health Ifbb Ironman Men's health Mike o'hearn Motivation Muscle & fitness. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Baseball Basketball Bench press Bodybuilding Chris bryant Compete Deadlift Diet Fitness Football Frank sepe Goal Health Ifbb Ironman Men's health Mike o'hearn Motivation Muscle & fitness. Show all posts

Thursday, June 25, 2020

US Sports Network Live #FreedomMatters

Hey There Athletes and Warriors!

1 John 4:4 King James Version (KJV)

Ye are of God, little children, and have overcome them: because greater is he that is in you, than he that is in the world.
Whacky wild and maybe scary times in our country and world Athletes and Warriors. But be of good cheer as greater is he that is in you than he that is in the world. Thank you for taking time out to tune in today. May you find our programming informative, educational, inspirational, and entertaining. Yes indeed we are in this together. We just as well smile along the way!

US Sports Radio Today!
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Monday, February 17, 2020

Trending Sports News and Live Streams Featuring: Lebron James, Kawhi Leonard, and Chris Paul on the new All-Star format and Kobe Bryant celebrations Presented on US Sports Net By BBcom

Lebron James, Kawhi Leonard, and Chris Paul talk about the new NBA All-Star format, free throws and honoring Kobe Bryant all weekend.


Do This LA-Fave Workout In Honor Of LA-Bron James

Not everything an elite athlete like LeBron James does is appropriate for everyday lifters. But this one thing is! Hit it hard, and it might be all you need. So says the King!
Do This LA-Fave Workout In Honor Of LA-Bron James

We're not going to tell you to work out exactly like LeBron James. Sorry! Not happening. Why? Because he's a 6-foot-8, 250-pound freak of nature who has been training for decades to thrive in a very specific athletic environment, the NBA. You're…almost definitely not. And even if you are, you're still not LeBron James.
Plus, to be completely honest, most of the workout snippets that James has let out over the years don't look like anything you'd want to do anyway. Anyone up for kneeling on an exercise ball while waving a Bodyblade today? Didn't think so.
That said, there is one undeniably awesome, undeniably brutal component to James' training that is worth submitting yourself to. It's the VersaClimber, a machine that provides a full-body strength and conditioning challenge unlike just about anything out there. It's also been central to the seemingly ageless James' training since his third season in the league, as well as to the rest of his former team, the Cleveland Cavaliers.
"If I could only have one piece of equipment to train with for the rest of my life," James once told ESPN, "this would be it." He put it in even more intimate terms on Instagram: "Me and my girlfriend!! All I need. Versa Climber is her name."
This is one case where athletes and celebs agree. Even though the VersaClimber has been around since the early 1980s, it recently went viral as "Hollywood's new favorite workout," and has been cited as a fave by everyone from Jennifer Aniston to Lady Gaga. James has also been known to hop into classes at Rise Nation, a VersaClimber-focused gym in West Hollywood. Now that he's donning the purple and gold of the Lakers, don't be surprised to see VersaClimber obsession take over his new team like it did his old one.
So, what do you do with it? If you're new to the VersaClimber, just climb aboard and push and pull. It really only has one action, a piston-style cross-body approximation of climbing up the side of a mountain. Set the resistance relatively low, and try to survive this simple workout:
  • Versaclimber: Max distance in 23 minutes, for LeBron James' number.

"But I Don't Have One!"

So, what if your gym doesn't have a VersaClimber? That's a common problem, and it's the only reason it's not on our list of the 10 Best Cardio Machines.
If that's the case, try this:
1. Make sure your gym really doesn't have one. VersaClimbers are such a battle to train on that most of us are conditioned to ignore them, even if they're right in front of us. James' manager Maverick Carter noted this in the ESPN article, saying, "There was one in my building in Miami in the gym. Nobody used it for the whole five years I lived there, except for me. Like, people don't like to use it."
2. Find a blend of cardio activities that combine pushing, pulling, and epic cardio. For instance, you could do this:
  • Rowing machine: Max distance in 11.5 minutes
  • Stair stepper: Max distance in 11.5 minutes
No, it's not exact, but it'll make all the same parts of your body cry uncle. Now go sweat like the King!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nick Collias

Nick Collias

Nick Collias is the Executive Editor at Bodybuilding.com.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

The XFL On US Sports Net Presented by BBcom Featuring: Highlights: Seattle Dragons 17, Tampa Bay Vipers 9

All the important plays from Seattle's home win over Tampa Bay in Week 2.

Power Athlete Football Strength Program!

3 part series! From lifting weights to plyometrics, this full program will guide you to football dominance!
Dear Football Player: The Power Football Program has established a new level of excellence. We are stepping into uncharted territory, and we, as a team must improve every aspect of the game in order to have success at this level and to become a dominant force in our style of play. We must work harder than ever to keep getting better. From the time this program begins, you will obtain new lifting goals by the end of the program. While most collegiate programs are based on maintenance, ours will be based on GAINING!
What will follow are many important steps you need to take to be successful. The power football strength program is designed to get you stronger, bigger, faster and more flexible.
Each workout is important to your success. The program is designed to improve you as a football player, not a weightlifter or bodybuilder. Remember, your dream is to be a dominant player. To claim our turf you must push your limits in the weight room so we can push our opponents around on the gridiron.
Power Football Strength Coordinator
Strength & Conditioning

Rules
  • All Players will wear their school football grays or school attire during designated football lifting hours!
  • No other school attire will be allowed during this time.
  • No street clothes or boots.
  • If you do more than what you are asked in your program you run the risk of NOT gaining.
  • You are ALL football players - So, if you are a 180-pound linebacker or a 200-pound lineman, GET INTO the weight room. You should be training your butt off to get bigger and stronger.
  • ALL other players across the nation are lifting, running and securing high goals for next season already. So should you. Or you will be pushed around. I don't like to be pushed. Do you?
  • Clean-up and strip weights
  • During lifting times all above rules will be in effect. The door will be closed and unless I am notified by you personally, and you miss, a form of punishment will be enforced.
  • If the passion to perform better in football is not in you, then I will enforce a punishment to get you in the weight room.
  • ALL WORKOUTS MUST BE SIGNED BY ME OR AN ASSISTANT COACH at the end of each workout.
  • If you are injured you are not exempt from doing this program. If you cannot walk you will train your upper body - If you cannot use your upper body then you will train your legs twice a week. I will not help those who do not help themselves. Is that clear enough for you?!
WARM-UP PROGRAM
1. With WEIGHTLIFTING - always STRETCH before and after each workout. Use the flexibility stretches at the end of the weightlifting section.
WARM-UP:
*Perform warm-up drill listed below before weight training.
1. Jump Rope 5 min.
OFF-SEASON WORKOUT

1. ALL Varsity will work out (4) DAYS PER WEEK - Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. Always stretch before and after each workout.
2. All workouts should be pursued with a high level of INTENSITY.
3. This training program is broken down into a very simple percentage and rep scheme.
4. This is the last and most important step. Only do the recommended number of repetitions that are indicated on your workout chart.
· Determine your strength level or (1 rep max) for the recommended exercises.
· Go to percentage chart (located in back of manual) find your strength levels in the left column then locate at top the percentage that matches your workout.
FLEXIBILITY

Flexibility is a key component in avoiding injury, by increasing the joint's range of motion. It is also a factor in increasing strength and speed. There are two types of stretching, ballistic and static. Ballistic stretching involves stretching exercises that require movement, usually some sort of bouncing. These tend to be better suited for warming up rather than increasing flexibility. In order to increase long-term flexibility, static type stretching is required.
Static stretches should be held for a period of 20-45 seconds. You should attempt to stretch as far as possible without any pain. Do not force stretches or have a partner push you through your stretches; this can result in injury. Your stretching should be done systematically similar to your approach to any type of training. Produce goals for your flexibility and work toward that goal in every stretch session. For example, you may want to place your palms on the floor when doing a standing toe touch stretch. Week by week, work toward the above by putting your palms on your shoes and progressing downward.
For your stretching program to be successful you must work at it. Only stretch when your muscles are warm, the best time for this is after a workout. On the following pages are a variety of stretching exercises that you may choose from. Try to incorporate 1 or more stretches for each body part listed. This stretch period should take between 10-15 minutes.
Another type of static stretching is called PNF (proprioreceptive neuromuscular facilitation) stretching. This stretching must be done with a partner. The athlete should assume the stretch position and hold it for 6-10 seconds. After the 6-10 seconds the partner will apply force to hold the athlete in his stretch position, the athlete should try to overcome this force and be held in an isometric contraction. This pattern should be followed for 3 cycles and the athlete should increase the stretch for each one.
Remember utilize the static type stretches, only stretch when warm and make flexibility one of your goals.
RUNNING PROGRAM

The running program has been designed to accomplish several goals that apply specifically to football. The areas that are incorporated are form, speed work, conditioning and plyometrics. A description of drills will be supplied for each aspect of the running workouts. For the first six weeks the running will be done two times per week; while the last six weeks, running will be done three times per week. These workouts should not take more than one hour to complete. If scheduling is a problem, running days can be combined with lifting days. It is important that you wait about 2-3 hours between these workouts.
Make sure you do not run before squatting.
Running Schedule
WEEK 1
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
2 x 440 yds at 90 secs -- 2 min. rest in between
4 x 220 yds at 40 sec -- 2 min. rest in between
4 x 100 yds at 15 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
b. Linemen
5 x 100 yds at 15 secs -- 90 sec. rest in between
10 x 50 yds at 8 sec -- full recovery in between
20 x 30 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery in between
4. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
WEEK 2Day 1
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
1 x 440 yds at 87 secs -- 90 sec. rest in between
5 x 220 yds at 40 secs -- 2 min. rest in between
5 x 100 yds at 15 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
b. Linemen
5 x 100 yds at 15 secs -- 90 sec. rest in between
10 x 50 yds at 8 sec -- full recovery
15 x 20 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
20 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
4. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Plyometrics (see plyometric drill section)
4. Stretch 10-15 min.
WEEK 3DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
4 x 220 yds at 36 secs -- 2 min. rest in between
8 x 100 yds at 14 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
4 x 50 yds at ¾ speed -- 60 sec. rest in between
b. Linemen
5 x 100 yds at 15 secs -- 90 sec. rest in between
5 x 60 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
10 x 30 yds at full speed -- full recovery
20 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
4. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
4. Stretch 10-15 min.

WEEK 4
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
2 x 220 yds at 35 secs -- 90 sec. rest in between
8 x 100 yds at 13 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 50 yds at ¾ speed -- 60 sec. rest in between
b. Linemen
5 x 100 yds at 15 secs -- 90 sec. rest in between
5 x 60 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
10 x 30 yds at full speed -- full recovery
15 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
4. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
4. Stretch 10-15 min.
WEEK 5
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
5 x 100 yds at 13 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
8 x 60 yds at 8 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 20 yds at full speed -- 60 sec. rest in between
b. Linemen
2 x 100 yds at 15 secs -- 90 sec. rest in between
4 x 60 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
10 x 30 yds at full speed -- full recovery
10 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
4. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
4. Stretch 10-15 min.

WEEK 6
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
5 x 80 yds at 10 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
8 x 50 yds at 7 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
12 x 15 yds at full speed -- 60 sec. rest in between
b. Linemen
2 x 80 yds at 12 sec -- 90 sec. rest in between
6 x 50 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
6 x 30 yds at full speed -- full recovery
10 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
4. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
REST J
WEEK 7
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
3 x 150 yds at 25 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 100 yds at 15 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 35 yds at full speed -- full recovery
b. Linemen
10 x 80 yds at 12 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 30 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
20 x 15 yds at full speed -- full recovery
3. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
5 x 30 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
6 x 60 yds at :08 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
3 x 100 yds at ¾ speed -- (hold form)
b. Linemen
20 x 10 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
8 x 30 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
5 x 60 yds at :09 sec -- full recovery
DAY 3
1. Warm-up
2. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
3. Stretch 10-15 min.
WEEK 8
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
10 x 100 yds at 14 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
8 x 60 yds at 10 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 30 yds at full speed
b. Linemen
10 x 80 yds at 12 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 30 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
20 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
3. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
5 x 35 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
6 x 55 yds at :07 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
3 x 100 yds at ¾ speed -- (hold form)
b. Linemen
15 x 15 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
6 x 25 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
4 x 50 yds at :09 secs -- full recovery

DAY 3
1. Warm-up
2. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
3. Stretch 10-15 min.
WEEK 9
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
10 x 100 yds at 14 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
8 x 45 yds at :06 secs -- full recovery
10 x 20 yds at full speed -- full recovery
10 x 10 yds starts full speed -- full recovery
b. Linemen
10 x 80 yds at 12 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 20 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
15 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
3. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
4 x 50 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
5 x 70 yds at :09 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
3 x 100 yds at ¾ speed -- (hold form)
b. Linemen
13 x 15 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
4 x 30 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
4 x 50 yds at :09 secs -- full recovery
DAY 3
1. Warm-up
2. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
3. Stretch 10-15 min.
WEEK 10
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
8 x 100 yds at 13 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
6 x 60 yds at 8 sec -- full recovery
10 x 25 yds at full speed
10 x 10 starts at full speed
b. Linemen
8 x 80 yds at 12 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
12 x 20 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
13 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
5 x 5 yds starts at full speed
3. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
6 x 35 at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
5 x 60 yds at :08 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
3 x 100 yds at ¾ speed -- (hold form)
b. Linemen
12 x 15 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
7 x 25 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
4 x 50 yds at :09 sec -- full recovery

DAY 3
1. Warm-up
2. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
3. Stretch 10-15 min.
WEEK 11
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Speed Work
a. Skilled Postions
2 x 100 yds at 13 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
4 x 60 yds at :08 sec -- full recovery
8 x 30 yds at full speed
8 x 10 yds starts at full speed
b. Linemen
4 x 60 yds at 12 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 20 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
12 x 10 yds at full speed -- full recovery
5 x 5 yds starts at full speed
3. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
6 x 40 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
5 x 50 yds at :06 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
3 x 80 yds at ¾ speed -- (hold form)
b. Linemen
10 x 15 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
6 x 25 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
4 x 50 yds at :09 sec -- full recovery

DAY 3
1. Warm-up
2. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
3. Stretch 10-15 min.
WEEK 12
DAY 1
1. Warm-up
2. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
4 x 60 yds at :08 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
4 x 40 yds at :05 sec -- full recovery
6 x 20 yds at full speed
6 x 10 yds starts at full speed
b. Linemen
4 x 40 yds at :06 sec -- 60 sec. rest in between
10 x 20 yds at full speed -- full recovery
10 x 15 yds at full speed -- full recovery
5 x 5 yds starts at full speed
3. Stretch 10-15 min.

DAY 2
1. Warm-up
2. Form - Run
3. Speed Work
a. Skilled Positions
6 x 40 at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
4 x 50 yds at :06 secs -- 60 sec. rest in between
4 x 60 yds at ¾ speed -- (hold form)
b. Linemen
10 x 15 yds at full speed -- 30 sec. rest in between
4 x 25 yds at ¾ speed -- full recovery
4 x 40 yds at :05 secs -- full recovery

DAY 3
1. Warm-up
2. Plyometrics (see plyometric drills section)
3. Stretch 10-15 min.
Plyometric Drills
  • 1. Always WARM-UP before doing these drills. Use 2-3 sets of 10 reps at 30 yards. Remember to STRETCH after completing these warm-up drills.
  • 2. The following exercises are used for speed, agility and vertical jump improvements. They are ESSENTIAL FOR IMPROVEMENT ON THE FOOTBALL FIELD.
1. SQUAT JUMP
Starting Position: Feet parallel shoulder width apart, fingers locked behind head.
Motion: Athlete squats to a parallel position approximately 136 degrees to 110 degrees knee flexion, then move vertically in an explosive rapid movement raising knees parallel to the waist then returns to starting position.
2. SINGLE LEG TUCK
Starting Position: Feet parallel shoulder width apart, fingers locked behind your head.
Motion: Athlete springs upward using a single foot takeoff, until thighs are parallel with the ground. Next he grabs both knees with hands and pulls toward chest, then return to starting position.
3. SPLIT SQUATS
Starting Position: One leg in front of the other with a 90-degree angle of flexion at the hip an knee (in a semi-lunge position). Keep back straight.
Motion: Interchange legs while doing the exercise jump approximately 6 inches off the ground while changing stance.
4. LATERAL HOPS
Starting Position: Feet together.
Motion: Athlete should jump laterally (side to side) over an object ranging from 8-to-20 inches, keeping feet together.
5. STANDING LONG JUMP
Starting Position: Feet together.
Motion: Athlete bends knees then explodes outward in front to cover as much distance as possible landing with feet together.
6. DOUBLE LEG HOPS
Starting Position: Feet together, body erect.
Motion: Athlete jumps up and out with double arm action with maximum effort for 3-5 reps.
For a MS Word printable version of this program, click here.
For a printable text version of this program, click here.
Recommend this article to a friend by e-mail by clicking here!
By Curtis Schultz. Curtis is a contributing writer for various health, bodybuilding and collegiate sports publications. Curtis has a B.S. in Sports Administration and is a Level I USWF Olympic Coach. He is a collegiate strength coach who has worked with many high-level athletes ranging from NFL stars to top-level bodybuilders. Powerlifting State and Regional champion in the 242 and 275 classes. He is also an AAU and USPF referee. Curtis was a 3-year Varsity football letter winner, All-greater Rochester Lineman in high school, and then Junior College and University All-conference lineman.

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Trending Sports News Featuring: Warriors trade D'Angelo Russell to Timberwolves for Andrew Wiggins, two picks | CBS Sports HQ

The trade talks between the Golden State Warriors and Minnesota Timberwolves regarding D'Angelo Russell appeared to be dead just a few days ago, after the Timberwolves declined to meet the Warriors' asking price. But they were revived on Thursday following some additional moves by the Timberwolves, and now the deal has gone through.


Yoga for Basketball Players from BBcom



Basketball is fun, but a serious athlete may need more than just simple stretching to stay in top form. Yoga instructor and Team Bodybuilding.com athlete Karla Tafra is back with more yoga poses to help you dribble, drive, and score with a body that moves well!

Yoga for Basketball Players


Every sport is unique, but athletes of all sports strive for improved performance, bigger goals, and better results. Yoga can help with all three, especially when it's tailored to the sport in question. We've talked about movements that work best for runners, and now it's time to talk about yoga and basketball.
The off-season may be in full swing, but that's the key time to make improvements. Recovery is as important as ever, if not more so. No one wants to develop aches and pains before the season even starts!
Basketball is extremely fast-paced, with lots of jumps, twists, turns, coordination, and sprints that take a huge toll on the joints and tendons. Keeping them flexible and strong prevents injuries and aids recovery. Here are the five favorite moves I include in every yoga flow to keep my basketballers in top condition:

Buy New York Yankees Tickets

Anjaneyasana: Crescent Lunge

The crescent lunge stretches the hamstring, quad, and hip flexor at the same time. Alignment is key, so make sure your knee doesn't go past your ankle, keep your extended leg straight, and engage your quadriceps throughout the stretch to protect that knee. Lift your arms up; use inhales to extend your whole spine and exhales to go deeper into the pose. Keep your shoulders away from your ears and relax your upper spine while at the same time making sure your core stays engaged. Take five full breath cycles and switch legs.
Anjaneyasana: Crescent Lunge

Vrksasana: Tree Pose

Balance is extremely important in basketball, as you're often stopping and starting, changing direction, staying on the balls of your feet on defense, or jumping off one leg to take a layup or dunk. Mimicking those moves in training and teaching your body to get stronger and engage the right muscles minimizes injuries and allows you to execute the movements more efficiently.
Vrksasana: Tree Pose
Tree pose is one of those standing balances that test you no matter how long you've been practicing yoga. Engage the muscles on your standing leg and lift the other one up, placing your foot on the standing leg above or below the knee, making sure to avoid pushing against the knee. Push the sole of your foot into your leg in order to create stability, not letting it slip away. Engage your core muscles and pull your ribcage down so that you're not going into a backbend. Remember to breath. You can intensify this pose by closing your eyes for a breath or two. Stay for 5-8 breaths and switch legs.

Virabhadrasana II: Warrior II

There's no doubt that a strong Warrior II is a foundation of every yoga practice. Not only does it open the hips and protect the lower back, but it also tones the legs and builds stability in the ankles. From Warrior I, open up to Warrior II, making sure you go as deep as your body allows. The challenge is in the depth of the pose—the deeper you go, the harder it gets!
Virabhadrasana II: Warrior II
Keep your bended knee directly over your ankle and pay attention to your back foot—the outer part should be firmly pressed into the floor. Building the pose from the ground up, open your hips as much as is comfortable, as long as your knee is in line with your hip. If the knee starts going inward, close up your hips a bit. Remove the curve from your lower back by pulling your belly button up and closing your ribcage. Keep your shoulders away from your ears and open your chest without leaning into a backbend. Gaze over your front arm and activate your hands, sending energy throughout your body. Taking deep breaths will help you settle deeper into the pose. After five cycles, repeat on the other side.

Kumbhakasana: Plank

Nothing works your shoulders and core like a good old plank. Trunk stability and a strong core lend themselves to coordination, rotation, balance, and maximizing your overall strength—all necessary in the sport of basketball.
Kumbhakasana: Plank
Place your palms right under your shoulders, engage your quads and hamstrings, tighten your core, and breathe. Make sure your hips are not too high or too low and avoid any curving in your lower back. Press into the floor beneath you and feel your shoulder blades separate from one another, creating space in your upper back. Stay there for a couple of breaths and then slowly shift your body forward and back, challenging your core even more.

Setu Bandhasana: Bridge

Bridge is a powerful pose that activates the hips and glutes while protecting the lower back and relieving it of any muscle pain. These muscle groups can take a beating when you're constantly pounding the hardwood, sprinting, and performing drills that emphasize explosiveness. The bridge is your ultimate relief.
Setu Bandhasana: Bridge
Lie on your back, bend your knees, and place your feet flat on the floor, hip-width apart. Position your arms beside your body, palms facing down and pressed into the floor. On an inhale, slowly lift your lower back, middle back, and, finally, upper back off the floor. You can leave your arms where they are or slowly roll your shoulders under your body. Then, interlace your fingers and push into the floor, creating a bigger opening in your chest.
Use inhales to elongate the spine and send your tailbone as far away from you as possible, and exhales to lift your hips even higher. Avoid bringing your chin toward your chest; instead, think chest toward the chin as you drive your hips higher.
If you like this article, you may love Mind Body Fit, an innovative, holistic approach to fitness that brings you the best of three worlds: workouts, yoga, and meditation.

About the Author


Karla Tafra

Karla Tafra, Yoga Instructor

When not doing yoga, Karla Tafra dabbles in everything from running, tennis, and lifting weights, to cycling and functional training.

Sunday, December 29, 2019

LSU Strenght & Conditioning Philosophy - Tommy Moffit Presented on US Sports Net By BBcom

With the College Football Playoff championship all set, let's help all of you athletes, warriors, parents, and coaches with some insight on one of the important aspects of being a champion on and off the field. While everyone may not be able to train one-on-one with the likes of a Coach Moffit, you can certainly take the philosophy and apply it to your programs. 
-Coach Nate

Get On The Field: Take The Fantasy Out Of Football And Start Playing Your Best



More NFL games during the week means more time on the weekend to play! Take the fantasy out of football and start playing your best with these training tips for amateur competitors.

Get On The Field: Take The Fantasy Out Of Football And Start Playing Your Best
It's Monday morning again. Your alarm clock wakes you from a deep sleep. It's time to start your week, joint pain and stiffness be damned. You define the weekend warrior. You live to subject your body to the court or field, embroiled against your friends (and enemies) in lively competition, but your weekday training could use a boost.
Make a decision: Train Monday through Friday so you can win the weekend wars.
This goal isn't easy. If you're like most people, you're stuck behind a desk for eight hours each day. Then you have to compete for equipment at your packed gym before racing home to spend time with your family. Combine that mess with those few extra pounds you've carried around for the last few years, and it feels like you're behind the 8-ball.
Have no fear! Focus on three key areas: shrink your stomach, increase your flexibility, build muscle in all the right places, and your performance will improve in a few weeks.

Rule 1. Train Your Glycolytic System

Your glycolytic system, also known as the anaerobic or lactic acid system, provides fuel for intense exercises that lasts more than 10 seconds but less than two minutes. Think of running a 400-meter sprint, or making it through a sustained, bang-bang series of football plays or basketball fast breaks.
These short, intense periods are often the turning points in both amateur and professional sporting events. The team or competitor who can stay strong through a minute more of action and not need a timeout afterward has a clear advantage that lasts long after the two-minute burst ends.

Short, intense periods are often the turning points in both amateur and professional sporting events.
Your glycolytic system is the one energy system that predominantly uses stored carbohydrates for energy. This offers a double bonus: By burning stored carbohydrates, you both lose fat and train your body to operate with sustained intensity.
For this reason, your workout should begin with a movement that taxes your glycolytic system. Here are some of my favorites:

100-Rep Deadlifts

Aim to complete 100 repetitions of a deadlift with a submaximal weight in less than 10 minutes. I typically recommend breaking up the 100 into sets of 20-25 reps at a time.

Aim to complete 100 repetitions of a deadlift in less than 10 minutes.
Rest as much as you want in between sets, but get the 100 reps done in less than 10 minutes.

Chin-Ups To Explosive Throws

I love this exercise pairing, because most people don't have enough upper body strength to complete more than 10 repetitions. As a result, feel free to add short rest periods to allow for partial recovery, so future reps of pull-ups can be completed.
Start by performing as many pull-ups as you possibly can. Once you fatigue, immediately drop down and perform 10 medicine ball explosive throws. Rest for 30 seconds, then repeat.
Don't have access to a medicine ball in your gym? No problem. Just keep a pair of dumbbells by you and perform a fast set of 10 reps of floor dumbbell presses.

Pre-Fatigued Core

Start by fatiguing your core with any basic movement like planks or cable chops. From here, perform a single-arm or single-leg exercises like flat dumbbell chest presses or rear-foot elevated split squats.
After pre-fatiguing your core you'll have a harder time performing the follow-up movement.

Rule 2. Train with Multiple Rep Ranges

One of the most common reasons why athletic injuries occur at any level is because the connective tissues—the ligaments and tendons—experience extra stress to which they are not accustomed.
This is why it's crucial to train with multiple different rep ranges, which condition your connective tissue to withstand the varying demands of your weekend athletic endeavors.
After your glycolytic system training is done, the second and third movements in your program should consist of a full-range-of-motion exercises that fatigue multiple muscle groups. Squats work incredibly well here, as do push-presses or squat-and-presses.
There are many exercises that combine lower and upper body, and which would work great as a set of 8 to 20 repetitions. Just make sure you perform a full range of motion.

Rule 3. Shorten Your Rest Periods

Shortening rest periods conditions your body to operate under a fatigue state. I can't overstate the importance of this. All those years of sitting on the sideline have left you unconditioned for the cutting and explosive demands of sports.
Your ability to delay the fatigue brought on by the depletion of substrates—the chemicals your muscles release when you're using them—is a critical component for increasing athletic performance.
Start by slowly decreasing your rest periods in between sets. Don't start out with 30-second rest periods. Rather, start with 60 seconds of rest, and then subtract 5 seconds during each workout until you're down to a 30-second rest.

What About Cardio?

I haven't mentioned aerobic or cardio work. Why is that? Traditional steady state or even interval training cardio doesn't effectively carry over to most athletic events besides marathon running. I can't see any reason to spend 30 minutes pounding away on the treadmill when you could be doing sport-specific conditioning.
You don't have to get too complex with it. Let's say your weekend sport is pick-up basketball. Well, head to the court during the week (if you can get on it with no one around). Work on your side shuffles or sprint forward and backward in short spaces.
If soccer or football is your game, get on the field and do sprints and lateral work. Any sport-specific work will pay off more than camping out on a machine. You'll see a greater carryover effect, and you'll have fun doing it.
Here's a sample workout utilizing these three simple training rules:
Sample Warrior Workout
1
Barbell Deadlift
4 sets, 25 reps (rest briefly between sets, but complete all in less than 10 minutes)
2
Plank
Superset with Dumbbell Bench Press
1 set, to failure
3
Dumbbell Bench Press
Rest: 60 seconds
3 sets, 12 reps (alternating arms)
4
Front Barbell Squat
Superset with Push Press
4 sets, 20 reps
5
Push Press
4 sets, 20 reps (rest 60 seconds)
6
Standing Cable Wood Chop
Perform kneeling.
3 sets, 15 reps (rest 30 seconds)
7
Jog In Place
Sport Specific Cardio (football) - last 5 exercises should take 15-20 minutes.
8
Single-Cone Sprint Drill
9
Football Up-Down
10
Prowler Sprint
11
Bear Crawl Sled Drags

About the Author

Jimmy Smith, MS, CSCS

Jimmy Smith is a certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) and is routinely sought after to provide cutting edge, no-B.S. advice.